Using shutter Speeds to create an artifact.

June 30, 2009
 
Using shutter speeds to create an interesting image is something that I have previously experimented with. Last October I used a Cannon 450 to take images of fair ground rides in motion. The point was to try and capture the movement of the lights on the ride in a different way that the eye can see. I was trying to get an interesting affect and a different point of view of the fair itself. I also took images of the crowds in fair.
I found what I wanted to produce was harder than it appeared to be. For the first images I held the camera in my hands and found that the images were not clear and I did not get the affect from the fair ground rides that I wanted. I found using a tripod helped me gain the affect I desired. I did however find using the handheld camera useful as I was able to gain a different perspective by changing the shutter speed and taking images of the crowd.
One of the first attempts at capturing Banbury town fair at night using different shutter speeds creating an affect with the lights of the fair.

One of the first attempts at capturing Banbury town fair at night using different shutter speeds creating an affect with the lights of the fair.

Capturing these police men was an attempt to look thorugh the eyes of an intoxicated person at the fair, possibly after having been on the ride also.

Capturing these police men was an attempt to look thorugh the eyes of an intoxicated person at the fair, possibly after having been on the ride also.

As a child I viewed the fair as a fun magical place where you got a thrilling experience in your town, not just the rides but the whole experience, the sound smell and general atmosphere. As I got older I realised there was also another side to the fair as there is with many events. The attraction to drink and take drugs during the three day event of the fair is made ever visible to me as I became older and I recognise the signs of a intoxicated individual or group of people by there actions and attitudes. Also the atmosphere seamed to differ in the day almost an annoyance that it was even in the town as people tried to go about there normal day but could not due to the rides blocking street accesses and easy access to shops and streets. All these different experiences from one event in our town.
The purpose of this image is to draw attention to the different perceptions of this town event. Not everyone enjoys some specticles.

The purpose of this image is to draw attention to the different perceptions of this town event. Not everyone enjoys some specticles.

I feel the idea of perception could be linked with the idea of the spectacle, how we personally perceive it, for example as a child I longed for the fair to come around, the sights, sound and thrills of it all but as an adult I enjoy it but also find slight annoyance that it makes my day to day activities more difficult for three days. Even Last year when I was trying to capture images of the fair I found it difficult to do not only because I was experimenting with shutter speed for the first time but also because its difficult to set up a camera and get the shot right in a massive crowd of people.
Thinking about the different sides of the fair is something I might like to continue with and possibly experiment more with taking different images of this spectacle next time it comes into town. possibly I could conical a group of peoples trip to the fair in a similar way that Richard Heeks managed to capture the bursting of a bubble.
The following shots are ones that I feel reflect succesful attempts at using shutter speed to capture patterns of light at the fair at night.
The lights create a circular pattern and at this shutter speed it loses the riders and the wires attaching the risers to the lighted section of the ride, giving the illusion its a spinning top. Possibly a reflection of the riders feelings as they float through the air feeling like they are floating unaided.

The lights create a circular pattern and at this shutter speed it loses the riders and the wires attaching the risers to the lighted section of the ride, giving the illusion its a spinning top. Possibly a reflection of the riders feelings as they float through the air feeling like they are floating unaided.

Froggitt is a ride that simulated hooping of a frog in a circular motion. The lights create interesting patterns like ones made on paper by stencils.

Froggitt is a ride that simulated hooping of a frog in a circular motion. The lights create interesting patterns like ones made on paper by stencils.

 

Capturing the motion of the ride with the spectacular images that form infront of the cammer using slow shutter speeds to see the path the ride takes.

Capturing the motion of the ride with the spectacular images that form infront of the cammer using slow shutter speeds to see the path the ride takes.

I would like to experiement with camera techniques again as I understand that the camera can never truly capture what they eyes sees so I would like to use the technology to capture what they eye can not see. In other words seeing the world differently is something that interests me. I would like to try filming something either growning or dying and speeding this up using editing.
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1/500th of a second – Capturing a spectacle

June 20, 2009

Whilst reading the news paper when feeding my little girl I noticed a really interesting article it was about an image a photographer had captured using a particular shutter speed.

A photographer called Richard Heeks has used 1/500th of a second to capture the moment a bubble bursts, four pictures printed in the Daily Mail on Monday 13th July features, the following link can take you to the on-line version of the telegraphs version of the article that was published in the Daily Mail.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/5813506/Photographer-captures-moment-a-bubble-bursts.html

Richard Heeks uses 1/500th of a second (shutter Speed) to create this image of the moment a bubble bursts. This is an excellent example of using the technology a camera can provide to create a frozen spectacle of human nature.
Richard Heeks uses 1/500th of a second (shutter Speed) to create this image of the moment a bubble bursts. This is an excellent example of using the technology a camera can provide to create a frozen spectacle of human nature.
The four images that were captured pinpoint exact moments in time so much so that you can see droplets of water forming as the bubble bursts. Without using such a quick shutter speed that particular image would be impossible to capture.
I have added a youtube videa about shutter speeds to remind myself how to use them as this is something I would be very interested in trying out to see what affects I could produce.